Saturday Kitchen: Week 30 
Rosemary 
Rosmarinus Officinalis


Rosemary is one of those ingredients that is so commonplace in my cooking that I had to check a couple of times that I hadn't already posted it. It's so familiar yet so versatile that its uses feel inexhaustible, therefore granting it one of my all time favourite flavours in the kitchen. 
Of course, roasted potatoes and rosemary is a timeless combination, but rosemary pairs so well with countless other flavours it's full of surprises. I used to really love a particular combination by a certain high street pizza chain that assembled silky leeks, punchy blue cheese, artichoke, slithers of prosciutto, a drizzle of chili and sprinkling of rosemary on the base. It's divine and one that I recreate at home quite a lot. The combination of heat, depth from the rosemary and saltiness from the cheese means it makes for a pretty punchy mouthful of food. 
And then there's rosemary in puddings- and I've not yet found a fruit that doesn't work- but Yotam Ottalenghi's apricot and rosemary galettes looks like a flavour sensation. https://www.theguardian.com/global/2016/apr/18/easy-ottolenghi-pudding-recipes

Whilst rosemary is generally considered to derive from the Latin for 'dew of the sea', it was once popular belief that it was actually named 'The Rose of Mary', the Mary being Mary Magdalene. The legend goes that the Virgin Merry tossed her signature blue cloak over a rosemary bush as she rested beneath it, and the white blossom of the bush miraculously turned blue as if blessed by the cloak thrown upon them.... Nevermind that but rosemary has now perhaps become the psychoactive drug of choice for studious millennial, with rosemary oil considered to have miraculous benefits for the memory... http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/rosemary-sales-surge-herb-boost-memory-holland-barrett-a7745231.html 
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